Thursday, June 23, 2011

Minnewaska Walk

Appalachian sandwort or stitchwort (Minuartia glabra), threatened status in NY and PA, as well as other states. We didn't notice it on the hike out, but on the way back, there it was. There it was again, and again, taking advantage of the trail edges. The shrubs easily overpower it - another plant that needs fire to clear space, but will hang on along trails. A familiar situation in NJ. Hey, watch your step!





On the way back from the Catskills, we often stop at Minnewaska State Park and walk a portion of the Long Trail, which wildfire burned in April 2008... 3,100 acres in total.


Dead wood still standing years after the blaze.

Sheep laurel is not a surprise.

Nor are the sassafras resprouts.

Nor, is the maleberry.

Nor the bracken fern.

Considering the thin, bony soil... but there is always something to learn. Always a surprise.


Whorled loosestrife which shows up in my clay-clod backyard near the drainage ditch? (Plants of PA says "dry, open woods", so I shouldn't be too surprised).

But, witch hazel, of moist, rocky woods?

But, winterberry holly, shrub of Sourlands forested wetlands?

Water is magical in these landscapes - a rill, a trickle, a brook, or bog. The plants find it.

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